Bibliographic Records


Database: Volunteer Voices: The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee
Query: vvcat: "A.2"


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Title: Painting depicting a Cherokee farmstead in the mid-18th century
Artist : Carlyle Urello
Date Created: 1983 - 1993
Abstract: This photograph is of a painting of a mid-18th century Cherokee farmstead. The painting was based on historic descriptions and archaeological excavations from the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley, conducted by the University of Tennessee 1967-1982. Excavations of Overhill Cherokee Villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project. Excavations continued until 1983, and laboratory studies and report preparation continued until 1987. The excavations were conducted in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley, in eastern Tennessee, by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002538
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Title: Order from State of Franklin to Greene County Sheriff
Creator : Daniel Kennedy
Date Created: 1785 - 1786
Abstract: Order from Daniel Kennedy, Clerk of Greene County in the State of Franklin to the Sheriff of Greene County that commands said Sheriff to require a citizen of Green County (Edward Sevetson?) to pay "Eighteen Shillings" to Thomas Williams.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: State of Franklin Documents, 1783-1787
Contributing Institution: C. M. McClung Historical Collection
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001380
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century iron trade ax recovered at Chota
Photographer : David Stansberry
Date Created: 1972 - 1984
Abstract: This photograph is of a European manufactured iron ax head traded to the Cherokees in the mid-18th century. It was recovered by the University of Tennessee during an excavation of the Overhill Cherokee village of Chota. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. Excavations of Chota were conducted from 1969-1974 in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The university worked under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Directors, J. Worth Greene, Duane H. King, and Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002521
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century European silver brooches and earrings
Photographer : David Stansberry
Date Created: 1975
Abstract: This is a photograph of mid-18th century European silver broaches and earrings recovered from excavations at the Overhill Cherokee Village of Chota. Chota or Echota was an Overhill Cherokee village located in what is today Monroe County, Tennessee. In the mid-18th century, Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful socio-economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee Nation. Chota, as with all the Overhill Cherokee sites, is now inundated by the Tellico Reservoir. Excavations of Overhill Cherokee villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project. Excavations continued until 1983, and laboratory studies and report preparation continued until 1987. The excavations were conducted in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley, in eastern Tennessee, by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal Investigator, Alfred K. Guthe.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002536
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century European manufactured iron hoe, Chota]
Photographer : David Stansberry
Date Created: 1970 - 1990
Abstract: This photograph is of a European manufactured iron hoe head traded to the Cherokees in the mid-18th century. It was recovered by the University of Tennessee during an excavation of the Overhill Cherokee village of Chota. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. The Cherokees kept small vegetable plots near their homes as well as maintained large communal agricultural fields of beans, corn, and squash. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002519
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century kaolin smoking pipes recovered at Chota
Photographer : David Stansberry
Date Created: 1972 - 1984
Abstract: This is a photograph of mid-18th century Kaolin smoking pipes recovered from Chota. The Overhill Cherokees traded actively with the lower Cherokees of Georgia and South Carolina. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. The University of Tennessee conducted excavations of Chota from 1969-1974 in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The university worked under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Directors, J. Worth Greene, Duane H. King, and Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002520
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Title: Computer generated map of an excavation unit at Chattooga showing post hole pattern of the Chattooga townhouse, created in 1993
Cartographer : Eric Howard
Cartographer : Brett Riggs
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a computer generated map of an excavated unit at the Chattooga site, showing the post hole pattern of the Chattooga townhouse. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and location of additional buildings/features were found with minimal disturbance to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002491
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Title: Computer generated topographic site map of the Chattooga site, created in 1993
Cartographer : Eric Howard
Cartographer : Brett Riggs
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a computer generated topographic site map of the Chattooga site indicating the location of archaeological structures. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations, and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and the location of additional buildings and features were found with minimal disturbance to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002482
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Title: Computer generated map of an excavation unit at the Chattooga site, created in 1993
Cartographer : Eric Howard
Cartographer : Brett Riggs
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a computer generated map of an excavated unit at the Chattooga site. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations, and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and the location of additional buildings and features were found with minimal disturbance to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002475
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century trade beads, kaolin pipe fragments, small metal buttons, and fragments of European ceramics, Chota
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1969
Abstract: This photograph is of glass trade beads, kaolin pipe fragments, and small metal button fragments found in excavations of the mid-18th century Cherokee village of Chota. The Overhill Cherokees traded actively with the lower Cherokees of Georgia and South Carolina. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002517
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Title: Photograph of small ceramic bowl excavated at Chota, taken in 1969
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1969
Abstract: This is a photograph of a small ceramic bowl recovered by excavations at Chota. Chota or Echota was an Overhill Cherokee village located in what is today Monroe County, Tennessee. In the mid-18th century, Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful socio-economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee Nation. Chota, as with all the Overhill Cherokee sites, is now inundated by the Tellico Reservoir. Excavations of Overhill Cherokee villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project. Excavations continued until 1983, and laboratory studies and report preparation continued until 1987. The excavations were conducted in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley, in eastern Tennessee, by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal Investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002537
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Title: Photograph of a carved steatite (soapstone) pipe excavated at the former site of the mid-18th century Cherokee town of Chota, take
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1969
Abstract: This is a photograph of a mid-18th century Cherokee carved steatite (soapstone) pipe that was excavated at the site of Chota in 1969. Chota was recognized by Native Americans and European settlers as a powerful social and economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002528
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century gunflints, musket balls, and lockplate recovered from Chota
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1967
Abstract: This photograph is of gunflints, musket balls, and a lockplate, all of which were mid-18th century trade items of the Cherokees found in archaeological excavations of Chota in what is today Monroe County. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002518
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14    
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Title: Photograph of fragment of Cherokee vessel with check stamp design, Chota, taken in 1969
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1969
Abstract: This is a photograph of a fragment of a Cherokee clay pot with a check stamp design. It was recovered in Chota by the University of Tennessee in 1969. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful social and economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. Excavations were conducted in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The university worked under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002522
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Title: Photograph of the postholes from a mid-18th century Cherokee winter domestic house at Chota
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1969
Abstract: This photograph shows the postholes of an 18th century domestic winter house at Chota, a former Overhill Cherokee village in what is today Monroe County. Winter houses were conical in shape with four central support posts and were generally about 30 feet in diameter and 15 feet high. Adjacent to these round winter homes was usually a rectangular building used for summer habitation. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002514
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Title: Photograph of the posthole pattern of a Cherokee segmented domestic structure ca. mid-18th century at the town of Tomotley, taken
Photographer : Gerald F. Schrodl
Date Created: 1976
Abstract: This is a photograph of posthole patterns of a Cherokee segmented domestic structure at the town of Tomotley in the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley. This structure dating back to the mid-18th century, although rectangular, appears to be more substantial than the typical summer dwelling. These sturdier structures that were often partitioned were discovered in Tomotley and Mialoquo in groups at angles to one another. It is a pattern similar to site patterning among the Creeks and Lower Cherokees and may reflect the presence of refugees settling in the Overhill country. Excavations of Tomotley were conducted by the University of Tennessee in 1976 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002544
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Title: Drawing of the mid-18th century Cherokee village of Chota
Cartographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1974 - 1984
Abstract: This drawing depicts the layout of Chota or Echota, an 18th century Overhill Cherokee village. It shows a central village plaza with both a circular winter council house and rectangular summer council house, which were used for public, social, and political events. Shown also are domestic dwellings with the same set-up, a circular winter house alongside a rectangular summerhouse. Also drawn are areas of dense refuse-filled pits. Archeological studies by the University of Tennessee from 1969 -1974 indicate that in the mid -1700's Chota had a population of around 300-500. There were approximately 60 domestic houses surrounding the village plaza that extended along the river for about a mile. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful social and economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Directors, J. Worth Greene, Duane H. King, and Gerald F. Schroedl
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002540
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Title: Photograph of the post hole pattern of an excavated townhouse at Chattooga, taken in 1993
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a photograph of the post hole pattern of an excavated townhouse at Chattooga. Townhouses were usually found in villages with a population of more than 350 people and was the most prominent building in the villages. Townhouses were where most of the social, ceremonial, and political activities took place in the village. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002489
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Title: Photograph of an overview of the 1993 excavations at Chattooga showing post hole patterns of structures 2 and 3, taken in 1993
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a photograph of an overview of the 1993 excavations at Chattooga showing post hole patterns of structures 2 and 3. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations, and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and the location of additional buildings and features were found with minimal disturbance to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002485
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Title: Photograph of the posthole patterns of a mid-18th century Cherokee townhouse at Mialoquo
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1977
Abstract: This is a photograph of posthole patterns of a winter townhouse dating back to the mid-18th century at the Overhill Cherokee village of Mialoquo. Overhill townhouses were situated in a common village plaza. There was generally a winter townhouse, which was a large circular dome in which a fire could be built in the center and an adjacent rectangular open pavilion for summer use. Both were used for public social and political activity. Excavations of Mialoquo were conducted by the University of Tennessee in 1977 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Jefferson Chapman. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002548
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21    
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Title: Photograph of archaeologists mapping the surface of the Chattooga site before the 1993 excavations, taken in 1993
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a photographic image of archaeologists mapping the surface of the Chattooga site before the beginning of the 1993 field season. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations, and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and the location of additional buildings and features were found with minimal disturbance to to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002486
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22    
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Title: Photograph of pit feature filled with refuse at mid-18th century Tomotley
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1974
Abstract: This is a photograph of a pit-feature at the Overhill Cherokee town of Tomotley. The pit was originally used to recover soil or to store food, and was later filled with refuse. Excavations of Overhill Cherokee villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project. Excavations continued until 1983, and laboratory studies and report preparation continued until 1987. The excavations were conducted in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley, in eastern Tennessee, by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal Investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002532
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Title: Photograph of an excavation at the Chattooga site , taken in 1993
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a photograph of a view of the 1993 excavation at the Chattooga site. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002476
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Title: Photograph of posthole pattern of the mid-18th century Cherokee townhouse and summer pavillion at Tomotley
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1976
Abstract: This is a photograph of posthole patterns dating back to the mid-18th century of two Cherokee townhouses found in Tomotley. The rectangular summer pavillion is on the left and the larger circular winter townhouse or council house is on the right. In these public buildings, social, political, and military meetings were held. Excavations of Tomotley were conducted by the University of Tennessee in 1976 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002545
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Title: Photograph of an elevated view of excavations at the Chattooga site, taken in 1993
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This photograph is of an elevated view of excavations at the Chattooga site in 1993. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations, and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and the location of additional buildings and features were found with minimal disturbance to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002478
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