Bibliographic Records


Database: Volunteer Voices: The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee
Query: vvcat: "D.15"


226 to 229 of 229
1 | 26 | 51 | 76 | 101 | 126 | 151 | 176 | 201 | 226
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226    
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Title: Zebadiah Pike to James Robertson in Nashville
Author : Zebadiah Pike
Recipient : James Robinson
Date Created: 1796-06-05
Abstract: A letter by Zebadiah Pike, Captain, to James Robertson in Nashville, Tennessee. Pike seeks direction in dealings with Chickasaw Indians. Pike relates that Captain Parks killed Cherokee men and took prisoners in May. Pike attempted to speak to Chickasaws about a certain prisoner, but it is not clear how the talks were resolved. He asks for a "line" about what to do from Robertson.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: James Robertson Papers
Contributing Institution: Vanderbilt University Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002712
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227    
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Title: Aerial view of the Chattooga site oriented to the north, taken in 1993
Photographer : Skyshots Inc.
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is an aerial view of the Chattooga site oriented to the north. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted. Through the use of surface collection, test pit excavations, and remote sensing equipment, vast amounts of artifacts and the location of additional buildings and features were found with minimal disturbance to the site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002490
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228    
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Title: Map of Overhill Cherokee sites, 18th century
Attributed name : Tellico Archaeological Project
Date Created: 1982 - 1992
Abstract: This is a photograph of a map of the Overhill Cherokee sites that were occupied during the 18th century. The map is based on Henry Timberlake's 1762 map of the area as well as archaeological investigations made in 1967 through 1982, by The University of Tennessee as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). These well- known Overhill settlements of Mialoquo, Tuskeegee, Toqua, Chota, Citico, Tallassee, and Chilhowee are now all under water. The Cherokees who were located in north Georgia, northwest South Carolina, and Western North Carolina had to travel over the mountains from South Carolina to reach their brethren who lived in the lower Tennessee and Hiawasee River Valleys and thus they were referred to as the Overhill Cherokees.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002542
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229    
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Title: Photograph of historic artifacts recovered from the Chattooga site, taken 1993
Photographer : Schroedl
Date Created: 1993
Abstract: This is a photograph of historic artifacts recovered from the Chattooga site that features trade beads, a Kaolin pipe stem, gun flint, and a button fragment. Chattooga is a Cherokee archaeological site that was formerly called 'Cherokee Town.' Cherokee Town was an 18th century village associated with the Lower town Cherokee communities of northern Georgia and western South Carolina. The site is thought to have been occupied for only 160 years and was abandoned by the Cherokees in the 1740s. This site is given special attention because it retained early 18th century Cherokee material culture. This material culture is difficult to find and distinguish on other Cherokee sites of the same time period. The University of Tennessee (UT) and the Francis Marion National Forest conducted archaeological excavations at Chattooga during 1989-1994. The focus of these excavations was to develop a better understanding of the nature of the historical Cherokee occupation at the site and compare these findings with those found on other 18th century Cherokee sites. As a result of these excavations, archaeologists were able to identify and partially excavate the remains of five superimposed council houses. In addition, the excavations of two winter structures and one summer domestic structure were conducted.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002477
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226 to 229 of 229
1 | 26 | 51 | 76 | 101 | 126 | 151 | 176 | 201 | 226
Previous hits