Bibliographic Records


Database: Volunteer Voices: The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee
Query: vvcat: "D.24"


126 to 150 of 674
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126    
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Title: Unidentified war casualties on hillside in Germany
Photographer : Gaskell Warren
Date Created: 1945
Abstract: A photograph of unidentified casualties on a hillside in Germany. The dead are dressed in civilian clothing and barbed wire can be viewed in the background. The image may be related to the Buchenwald concentration camp which was located in Weimar, Germany. Many images owned by American soldiers were stolen from Nazis after the capture of their camps or their homes, and this image may have been taken at an earlier time and then appropriated by Gaskell Warren after his division took hold of Berchtesgaden, Germany where many Nazi had homes.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Gaskell Warren Collection
Contributing Institution: Cookeville History Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000000545
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127    
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Title: Liberation of a French town
Photographer : Gaskell Warren
Date Created: 1945
Abstract: An image Gaskell Warren took in France of a town along the Meuse being liberated by the Allies. Troops entered the city on military jeeps; heavily armored, carrying weapons, with their faces blackened. The scene takes place in a commercial area in the midst of a cafe, a restaurant (a "Charcuterie" is a restaurant that serves cured meat), and shoppes.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Gaskell Warren Collection
Contributing Institution: Cookeville History Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000000587
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128    
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Title: General Orders, April 5th 1789
Author : General H. Bradford
Date Created: 1789-04-05
Abstract: General orders written by General H. Bradford which describe security measures needed on the frontier including mustering troops and dealing with "savage enemy." The recipient is urged to have the militia ready at a minute`s notice and have a rendezvous point where they can meet with their weapons, including a good gun and nine charges of powder each.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: James Robertson Papers
Contributing Institution: Vanderbilt University Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002705
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129    
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Title: Invitation to a ball in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in honor of the anniversary of the Victory at New Orleans, 1828
Associated name : George A Sublett
Date Created: 1828-01-03
Abstract: This invitation is for a ball at the Washington Hotel in Murfreesboro, Tennessee to take place on January 8, 1825. It is to honor the victory of the United States at the Battle of New Orleans on January 8, 1815. The managers of the ball are George A. Sublett, H.D. Jamison, Russell Dance and James Holmes.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Tennessee Historical Society Miscellaneous Files, 1688-1951
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Historical Society
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000002609
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130    
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Title: Discharge Notification of Officers from Tennessee from U.S. Army, March 11, 1862
Signer : George D. Ruggles, -1904
Date Created: 1862-03-11
Abstract: This example is one of dozens of official resignation notifications from the United States Army to the Governor of Tennessee. The form provides the rank, name, division and date effective for each resignation. The dates on this particular notice include December 26, 1861 through February 25, 1862.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
Contributing Institution: Tennessee State Library and Archives
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001881
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131    
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Title: Photograph of mid-18th century gunflints, musket balls, and lockplate recovered from Chota
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1967
Abstract: This photograph is of gunflints, musket balls, and a lockplate, all of which were mid-18th century trade items of the Cherokees found in archaeological excavations of Chota in what is today Monroe County. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002518
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132    
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Title: Forrest's Raid
Illustrator : George H Ellsbury
Date Created: 1864-09-10
Abstract: Three sketches from Harper's Weekly of Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's raid of Memphis, TN. Two separate incidents of gunfire are shown at a house and a prison.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
Collection: Prints from Harpers Weekly Newspaper and Frank Leslies Illustrated Newspaper
Contributing Institution: Memphis Public Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000002835
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133    
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Title: 1832 Aug. 13, West Point, N[ew] York [to] Charles F. Welcker, Kingston, E[ast] Tennessee
Author : George L. Welcker
Recipient : Charles F. Welcker
Date Created: 1823-08-13
Abstract: The following document is a letter dated August 13, 1832, from George L. Welcker in West Point, NY to his brother, Charles F. Welcker, in Kingston. George writes to inform his family of his well-being since arriving at the military academy, and he inquires about the latest news from home.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Charles Freeling Welcker Papers
Contributing Institution: C. M. McClung Historical Collection
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000003157
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134    
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Title: 1833 Jan. 27, West Point, N[ew] Y[ork] [to] Father
Author : George L. Welcker
Date Created: 1833-01-27
Abstract: The following document is an excerpt of a letter written by George Welcker at the West Point military academy to his father in Tennessee. In the letter, George updates his father on issues related to his schooling, including his position in recent class rankings and fellow Tennesseans at West Point.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Charles Freeling Welcker Papers
Contributing Institution: C. M. McClung Historical Collection
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002946
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135    
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Title: Diary of George W. Miller
Author : George W. Miller
Date Created: 1862-02 - 1863-12
Abstract: George W. Miller, a soldier in the Union Army, kept a diary of the Civil War from February 1862 to December 1863. The diary begins with a description of the Battle of Fort Henry. It then records the soldiers` march through McMinnville, TN and Louisville, KY. The diary ends with a description of the Battle of Stones River in Murfreesboro.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
Collection: Miscellaneous History
Contributing Institution: Pink Palace Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000003589
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136    
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Title: Circular letter to the citizens of Tennessee
Author : George Washington Campbell, 1769-1848
Date Created: 1813-08-16
Abstract: This particular copy of the circular letter was sent to the "Mr. Postmaster & the citizens of the town & neighborhood of McMinnville, Tennessee." Three typed pages in length, Campbell outlines the events of the time that led the United States to declare war on Great Britain, and explains his views on direct taxes and internal duties, the impressment of American seamen by Great Britain, and other conflicts with the British.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Tennessee Historical Society Miscellaneous Files, 1688-1951
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Historical Society
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000002601
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137    
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Title: Photograph of unexcavated structural ruins at Fort Southwest Point, Kingston, Tennessee
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of unexcavated structural ruins at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. The ruins show that the structures were composed of stacked mortared and unmortared limestone blocks and, occasionally, river rocks. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include and officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002504
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138    
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Title: Photograph of a reconstructed blockhouse and stockade wall at Fort Southwest Point, Kingston, Tennessee, taken ca. 1980s
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reconstructed blockhouse and stockade wall at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. The blockhouse is constructed from hewn logs and is one of four reconstructed blockhouses at the fort. The stockade was was first used as a defensive wall, but eventually was used to contain the Cherokees who were to be removed to the west. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarter for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002483
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139    
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Title: Photograph of a pit feature excavation at Fort Southwest Point in Kingston, Tennessee, taken circa 1980s
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a pit feature being excavated at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features. Additional excavations were conducted at Fort Southwest Point in the 1990s yielded new information as to the fort's original layout and functions, as well as the life ways of the people who occupied it.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002510
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140    
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Title: Photograph of the Fort Marr Blockhouse in Benton, Tennessee
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of the Fort Marr Blockhouse located at Benton in Polk County, Tennessee. Fort Marr, also known as 'The Old Fort,' was constructed around 1814 near Old Fort, Tennessee. The fort was positioned along the Old Federal Road and housed troops who were assigned to protect white travelers using the road and the Cherokees from Creek retaliation. The fort was also said to have been used to safeguard supplies and as a campsite for soldiers in transit during the Creek War of 1814-1815. The name Fort Marr was established when the fort was renovated into a stockade to use during the removal of the Cherokee people to the west. It is believed that the fort was named after George Washington Lent Marr, who served under Andrew Jackson during the War of 1812 and the campaign of 1813-1814. After being relocated several times since its construction, it was moved to its present location at Benton in 1965. In 1980, Fort Marr became the property of the Conservation Department of the state of Tennessee to be maintained and used as a historic site.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002501
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141    
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Title: Photograph of the interior of Fort Loudoun, British colonial military post from 1756-1760, lower Little Tennessee River
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1975
Abstract: This is a photograph of the interior of Fort Loudoun, a British colonial military post on the lower Little Tennessee River that was occupied from 1756-1760. It was built in Overhill Cherokee territory in what is presently Monroe County and named for John Campbell, the Earl of Loudoun, who was commander-in-chief of British forces in the colonies. William G. De Brahm designed the fort, but abandoned the project because of disagreements he had with Capt. Demerre who commanded the militia troops and British regulars stationed at the post. Survival of this frontier outpost was dependent on good relations with the Cherokees who supplied food for trade goods. During the French and Indian War, tensions began to mount between the Cherokees and the colonists. In March 1760 the Cherokees laid siege to the fort, cutting off supplies and forcing its surrender. Excavations of Fort Loudoun were conducted by the University of Tennessee from 1975-1977 in anticipation of the flooding of the lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator and Field Director, Carl Kutruff.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002493
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142    
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Title: Photograph of a reconstructed blockhouse at Fort Southwest Point in Kingston, Tennessee, taken circa 1980s
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reconstructed blockhouse at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. There are four reconstructed blockhouses at the fort, with two blockhouses located at the west end of the fort and the other two located at the east end. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced an ore detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002481
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143    
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Title: Photograph of a reconstructed barracks at Fort Southwest Point, Kingston, Tennessee
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reconstructed barracks at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. The barracks are made with hewn logs and are double penned structures with a fireplace in the middle of the building. The barracks were most likely used to house the enlisted men that occupied the fort. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002503
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144    
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Title: Photograph of a reconstructed barracks at Fort Southwest Point, Kingston, Tennessee, taken ca. 1980s
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reconstructed barracks at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. The barracks are made with hewn logs and are double penned structures with a fireplace in the middle of the building. The barracks were most likely used to house the enlisted men that occupied the fort. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002487
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145    
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Title: Photograph of unexcavated structural ruins at Fort Southwest Point in Kingston, Tennessee, taken circa 1980s
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of unexcavated structural ruins at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. The ruins show that the structures were composed of stacked mortared and unmortared limestone blocks and, occasionally, river rocks. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features. Additional excavations were conducted at Fort Southwest Point in the 1990s.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002509
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146    
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Title: Photograph of a reconstructed blockhouse at Fort Southwest Point, Kingston, Tennessee
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroeld
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reconstructed blockhouse at Fort Southwest Point, located near the city of Kingston, in Roane County, Tennessee. There are four reconstructed blockhouses at the fort, with two blockhouses located at the west end of the fort and the other two located at the east end. Fort Southwest Point was established in 1792 as a blockhouse post for the territorial militia troops that were protecting white settlers from Indian acts of hostility. By 1797, the militia was replaced by Federal troops whose goals were to maintain peace with the Indians and protect their rights on the frontier. During the years between 1801-1807, the fort was established as the headquarters for the Cherokee Agency. In 1974, archaeological crews from the University of Tennessee unearthed portions of six fort building foundations, the remains of a massive stone wall, and many fort-period artifacts. A 1984 excavation of the site by the Department of Conservation and the City of Kingston located the sites of a total of thirteen buildings. These buildings include an officer's barracks, four blockhouses, and several buildings that are believed to have been barracks. A complementary excavation in 1986 revealed the location of two more buildings, bringing the total to fifteen buildings. The excavation also produced a more detailed examination of the palisade and stone wall enclosures, and uncovered several historic and prehistoric features.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Revolution and the New Nation (1754-1820)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002502
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147    
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Title: Soldiers
Photographer : H. P. Anderson
Date Created: 1883 - 1892
Abstract: Names recorded on the reverse side of the photograph include Will J. Hoskins, Sam L. Byrd, Tom McKamy, and N. T. Hall, who may be Ney Tucker Hall. Ney Tucker Hall was born in Bradley County in 1863.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900)
Collection: Cleveland Public Library History Branch Collection
Contributing Institution: Southeast Tennessee Digital Archive Cleveland State Community College
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001459
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148    
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Title: H.S. Hay in Champaign, IL to Gen. John Eaton in Nashville, TN
Author : H. S. Hay
Recipient : John Eaton, 1829-1906
Date Created: 1867-09-13
Abstract: Asks Eaton`s help in getting a pension. Informs him that the disease contracted while in the service is responsible for his present poor health.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
Collection: John Eaton Correspondence, 1865-1905
Contributing Institution: University of Tennessee Special Collections Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001783
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149    
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Title: H.S. Hay in Champaign, IL to Gen. John Eaton in Nashville, TN
Author : H. S. Hay
Recipient : John Eaton, 1829-1906
Date Created: 1869-02-05
Abstract: Observes that for two years the writer has been trying to contact Eaton and obtain a certificate from him. Reminder that this certificate from him is all that is needed in order for the writer to receive a pension for a disease contracted during the war.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
Collection: John Eaton Correspondence, 1865-1905
Contributing Institution: University of Tennessee Special Collections Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001737
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150    
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Title: H.S. Hay in Urbana, IL to Col. John Eaton in Memphis, TN
Author : H. S. Hay
Recipient : John Eaton, 1829-1906
Date Created: 1867-03-15
Abstract: Requests aid in being placed on the pension list for disabled Union soldiers. Description of his service during the war and his contracting of chronic diarrhea due to exposure. Mention of manuscripts belonging to his deceased wife.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877)
Collection: John Eaton Correspondence, 1865-1905
Contributing Institution: University of Tennessee Special Collections Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001786
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