Bibliographic Records


Database: Volunteer Voices: The Growth of Democracy in Tennessee
Query: vvcat: "D.2"


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Title: A.O. Fisher in Knoxville, Tennessee to Thomas Crutchfield in Hamilton County, Tennessee
Author : A.O. Fisher
Recipient : Thomas Crutchfield
Date Created: 1842-03-25
Abstract: A letter from A.O. Fisher in Knoxville, TN, to Thomas Crutchfield in Hamilton County, TN. Fisher wrote the letter while a student at East Tennessee University. In the letter, he discusses "Burning Time" at the University and the plastering of different buildings on campus. Fisher tells Crutchfield that he is in need of money.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Monroe County Archives
Contributing Institution: Monroe County Archives
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000003584
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Title: Hermitage Burnt
Author : Daily Evening Transcript
Associated name : Andrew Jackson, 1767-1845
Date Created: 1834-10-27
Abstract: An original copy of the Monday Evening October 27, 1834 "Daily Evening Transcript" volume 5, number 1290, published in Boston, Massachusetts. Page 2 contains a story about The Hermitage being damaged by fire. The fire occured on October 13, 1834.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: The Hermitage Historic Collection
Contributing Institution: The Hermitage
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001044
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Title: Houses along one of the canals in the town of Verdun
Photographer : Anne Porterfield Rankin, 1877-1941
Date Created: 1916 - 1918
Abstract: This photograph shows the destruction along a canal in Verdun, France, during World War I. The area closest to the canal is full of stone rubble.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)
Collection: Rankin, Anne Porterfield Photograph Collection, ca. 1890-1930
Contributing Institution: Tennessee State Library and Archives
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001387
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Title: A town near Verdun
Photographer : Anne Porterfield Rankin, 1877-1941
Date Created: 1916 - 1918
Abstract: This photograph shows the destruction brought by World War I to a town near Verdun, France. Buildings on either side of an intersection lie in rubble, with a damaged Cathedral in the background.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)
Collection: Rankin, Anne Porterfield Photograph Collection, ca. 1890-1930
Contributing Institution: Tennessee State Library and Archives
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001388
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Title: The Arnwine cabin from Grainger County, Tenneessee
Architect : Arnwine Family
Date Created: 1800
Abstract: West Arnwine and his descendants lived in this cabin in the early 19th century. It was built about 1800 on the Clinch River near Liberty Hill in Grainger County. The cabin is listed on National Register of Historic places.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Museum of Appalachia
Contributing Institution: Museum of Appalachia
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000000518
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Title: Swiss American Sketchbook
Artist : Auguste Burnand
Date Created: 1855 - 1856
Abstract: French-Swiss Auguste Burnand (ca. 1835-1860?), who lived in a small Swiss colony in the vicinity of Knoxville from 1853-1860, is the creator of these sketches. His sketchbook of pencil drawings, done in 1855 and 1856, occasionally with a watercolor wash includes scenes of the houses, social life and working life in the area of Knox County. It also includes the oldest surviving drawings of several Knoxville houses, including those of prominent persons, and of local landmarks.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Swiss American Sketchbook, 1855-1856
Contributing Institution: C. M. McClung Historical Collection
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200700000001486
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Title: A History of Tennessee
Author; Researcher : Austin Miller
Date Created: 1888
Abstract: A handwritten history of Tennessee written by Judge Austin Miller of Bolivar, TN. Miller lists the different cities that were used as state capital before Nashville and describes the Capitol Building in Nashville. Miller then documents the key persons and events that shaped the state, with a timeline that begins in 1540 and continues until 1888.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Tennessee History
Contributing Institution: Magnolia Manor
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000003585
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Title: Giles County Court House Pulaski, Tenn - 107076
Recipient : Briller, Mrs. H.N.
Date Created: 1935-06-10
Abstract: 2 tifs. A postcard of the Giles County Courthouse in Pulaski, Tennessee. The black and white photograph of the building shows the tree lined lot spotted with cars. The building features with a colonnaded clock tower atop a four-sided temple style building, in the Beaux Arts design. The first courthouse was built in 1811, and due to fire the building had to be reconstructed three times. The courthouse built in 1859 by the George Moore and Sons company cost nearly $30,000 to complete. It stood through the American Civil War, but suffered much damage. The building was reconstructed in 1908 at a cost of $133, 000. The courthouse was added to the national register of historical places in 1983. The verso reads "Giles County Court House Pulaski, Tenn. Erected 1908 at cost of $133,000. Reached home at [unknown] and [unknown] Isabels put [unknown]...and regrettable error. Found lots to do will write later. Polly and my [unknown] happy to see us again. Our trip was all around a most pleasurable one and you just don't know how happy [unknown] to see you once again. Mrs A feel for you and yours. You were lovely to see- M-." The time stamp reads: Pulaski June 10 3:30 AM 1935. The printer is listed as Curt Teich and Co., Inc., Chicago, U.S.A. It was mailed with a green one-cent stamp with the profile of Benjamin Franklin.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Postcard Collection
Contributing Institution: Giles County Historical Society
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001638
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Title: Travellers Rest in the 1930s
Photographer : Dickenson Jr., Jacob McGavock
Date Created: 1930
Abstract: This photograph is titled, "Travellers Rest in the 1930s". It shows the Neo-Colonial front facade of Travellers Rest, which stood on the building from c.1920-1954. The picture was taken when Travellers Rest was owned by the Dickinson family and used as an Arabian horse farm.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Travellers Rest
Contributing Institution: Travellers Rest Plantation and Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002102
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Title: Dispensary, The Alpine School
Donor : Dr. Hugh W. MacMillan
Date Created: 1935
Abstract: A photograph of the Alpine School Dispensary. From the collection of Dr. Hugh W. MacMillan. From the donation letter: Dr. MacMillan was a dentist from Cincinnati, Ohio who went down at the request of the board to give the students dental check-ups. Dr. MacMillan died in 1992 at the age of 101, and left this collection behind. Overton County, From state plaque - Alpine School - Organized by Dr. John L. Dillard on the top of Alpine Mountain in 1821, the school was moved off the mountain after the Civil War and named Alpine Institute. A. H. Roberts, later governor, taught there. The dispensary had rooms for a nurse and a teacher. County: Overton
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Alpine School Collection
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Tech University- Volpe Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001978
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Title: Christ Church Presbyterian under construction, Alpine, Tenn.
Donor : Dr. MacMillan, Hugh W.
Date Created: 1935
Abstract: A photograph of the Christ Church Presbyterian under construction in Alpine Tennessee. From the collection of Dr. Hugh W. MacMillan. From the donation letter: Dr. MacMillan was a dentist from Cincinnati, Ohio who went down at the request of the board to give the students dental check-ups. Dr. MacMillan died in 1992 at the age of 101, and left this collection behind. Overton County, From state plaque - Alpine School - Organized by Dr. John L. Dillard on the top of Alpine Mountain in 1821, the school was moved off the mountain after the Civil War and named Alpine Institute. A. H. Roberts, later governor, taught there. County: Overton
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Alpine School Collection
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Tech University- Volpe Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001983
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Title: John Allen McDonald at the Post Office, 1930
Donor : Dr. MacMillan, Hugh W.
Date Created: 1930
Abstract: A photograph of John Allen McDonald at the Post Office in Alpine Tennessee, 1930.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Alpine School Collection
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Tech University- Volpe Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001402
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Title: Shop Building, Alpine School
Donor : Dr. MacMillan, Hugh W.
Date Created: 1935
Abstract: This is a photograph of the Shop Building of Alpine School. From the collection of Dr. Hugh W. MacMillan. From the donation letter: Dr. MacMillan was a dentist from Cincinnati, Ohio who went down at the request of the board to give the students dental check-ups. Dr. MacMillan died in 1992 at the age of 101, and left this collection behind. Overton County, From state plaque - Alpine School - Organized by Dr. John L. Dillard on the top of Alpine Mountain in 1821, the school was moved off the mountain after the Civil War and named Alpine Institute. A. H. Roberts, later governor, taught there. This building was used for printing, woodworking and car engine repair. County: Overton
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Alpine School Collection
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Tech University- Volpe Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001986
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Title: Alpine School, Alpine, Tennessee
Donor : Dr. MacMillan, Hugh W.
Date Created: 1935
Abstract: Dr. Hugh W. MacMillan ; From the donation letter: Dr. MacMillan was a dentist from Cincinnati, Ohio who went down at the request of the board to give the students dental check-ups. Dr. MacMillan died in 1992 at the age of 101, and left this collection behind. Overton County, From state plaque - Alpine School - Organized by Dr. John L. Dillard on the top of Alpine Mountain in 1821, the school was moved off the mountain after the Civil War and named Alpine Institute. A. H. Roberts, later governor, taught there in the early 1890s. The school was revived in 1917 by the Board of the National Missions of the U.S.A. Presbyterian Church. The elementary school in 1936 and the high school in 1946 were turned over to Overton County. Notes - the photos from 1992 show the rubble of the school. County: Overton 1 tif
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Great Depression and World War II (1929-1945)
Collection: Alpine School Collection
Contributing Institution: Tennessee Tech University- Volpe Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000001400
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Title: Photograph of the postholes from a mid-18th century Cherokee winter domestic house at Chota
Photographer : George Fielder
Date Created: 1969
Abstract: This photograph shows the postholes of an 18th century domestic winter house at Chota, a former Overhill Cherokee village in what is today Monroe County. Winter houses were conical in shape with four central support posts and were generally about 30 feet in diameter and 15 feet high. Adjacent to these round winter homes was usually a rectangular building used for summer habitation. Excavations of Chota and other Overhill villages were conducted by the University of Tennessee between 1967 and 1983 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, J. Worth Greene.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002514
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Title: Photograph of the posthole pattern of a Cherokee segmented domestic structure ca. mid-18th century at the town of Tomotley, taken
Photographer : Gerald F. Schrodl
Date Created: 1976
Abstract: This is a photograph of posthole patterns of a Cherokee segmented domestic structure at the town of Tomotley in the Lower Little Tennessee River Valley. This structure dating back to the mid-18th century, although rectangular, appears to be more substantial than the typical summer dwelling. These sturdier structures that were often partitioned were discovered in Tomotley and Mialoquo in groups at angles to one another. It is a pattern similar to site patterning among the Creeks and Lower Cherokees and may reflect the presence of refugees settling in the Overhill country. Excavations of Tomotley were conducted by the University of Tennessee in 1976 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002544
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Title: Drawing of the mid-18th century Cherokee village of Chota
Cartographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1974 - 1984
Abstract: This drawing depicts the layout of Chota or Echota, an 18th century Overhill Cherokee village. It shows a central village plaza with both a circular winter council house and rectangular summer council house, which were used for public, social, and political events. Shown also are domestic dwellings with the same set-up, a circular winter house alongside a rectangular summerhouse. Also drawn are areas of dense refuse-filled pits. Archeological studies by the University of Tennessee from 1969 -1974 indicate that in the mid -1700's Chota had a population of around 300-500. There were approximately 60 domestic houses surrounding the village plaza that extended along the river for about a mile. Chota was recognized by Europeans as well as other Indians for its powerful social and economic influence and was regarded as the capital of the Cherokee nation. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Directors, J. Worth Greene, Duane H. King, and Gerald F. Schroedl
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002540
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Title: Photograph of posthole pattern of the mid-18th century Cherokee townhouse and summer pavillion at Tomotley
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1976
Abstract: This is a photograph of posthole patterns dating back to the mid-18th century of two Cherokee townhouses found in Tomotley. The rectangular summer pavillion is on the left and the larger circular winter townhouse or council house is on the right. In these public buildings, social, political, and military meetings were held. Excavations of Tomotley were conducted by the University of Tennessee in 1976 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Alfred K. Guthe. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002545
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Title: Photograph of a reconstructed Cherokee cabin at the Red Clay site at Red Clay State Park in Bradley County, Tennessee
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reconstructed Cherokee cabin at the Red Clay site at Red Clay State Park in Bradley County, Tennessee. The cabin is a chinked log cabin with two stories. There are also reconstructed outbuildings that would have associated with the Cherokee farmers' homesteads of the time. By 1832, the state of Georgia had refused the Cherokee the right to hold council meetings unless the meeting dealt with treaties that gave away their lands. The Cherokee decided to move their capital from New Echota, Georgia across the state line to Red Clay, Tennessee because the state of Tennessee did not prohibit the Cherokees from meeting together. Thus, Red Clay became the seat of the Cherokee government in 1832 and lasted until the removal of the Cherokees to the west in 1838. Red Clay was composed of 11 general councils and the meetings were attended by up to 5000 people. It was at Red Clay that the Cherokee learned that they had lost all of their land and would be removed to the west. Red Clay consists of the sacred Blue Hole Spring, a reconstructed council house, and several reconstructed homestead homestead buildings. Red Clay is also the home to the Eternal Flame, lit on April 6, 1984. The Cherokees took hot coals from their council fire at Red Clay on the Trail of Tears. The flame was later taken to Cherokee, North Carolina in the 1950s but was returned to Red Clay in 1984.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002506
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Title: Photograph of a reduced scale reconstruction of a Cherokee council house at Red Clay State Park, Bradley County, Tennessee, taken
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a reduced scale reconstruction of the Cherokee council house at the Red Clay site at Red Clay State Park in Bradley County, Tennessee. This reconstruction is of a summer council house, not the original house. The original council house would have been much larger in order to accommodate the nearly 5000 people who would have gathered there. By 1832, the state of Georgia had refused the Cherokee the right to hold council meetings unless the meeting dealt with treaties that gave away their lands. The Cherokee decided to move their capital from New Echota, Georgia across the state line to Red Clay, Tennessee because the state of Tennessee did not prohibit the Cherokees from meeting together. Thus, Red Clay became the seat of the Cherokee government in 1832 and lasted until the removal of the Cherokees to the west in 1838. Red Clay was composed of 11 general councils and the meetings were attended by up to 5000 people. It was at Red Clay that the Cherokee learned that they had lost all of their land and would be removed to the west. Red Clay consists of the sacred Blue Hole Spring, a reconstructed council house, and several reconstructed homestead buildings. Red Clay is also the home to the Eternal Flame, lit on April 6, 1984. The Cherokees took hot coals from their council fire at Red Clay on the Trail of Tears. The flame was later taken to Cherokee, North Carolina in the 1950s but was returned to Red Clay in 1984.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002507
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Title: Photograph of a scale cabin reconstruction at Red Clay State Park, Bradley County, Tennessee, taken circa 1980s
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1980
Abstract: This photograph is of a scale cabin reconstruction at the Red Clay site at Red Clay State Park in Bradley County, Tennessee. Federal Period Cherokee did not use machine rounded logs or saddle notch in the construction of their log cabins like what the photograph here shows. The Federal Period Cherokee would have cut their own logs and would have used wither dovetail, half-dovetail, or 'V' notching for their cabins. By 1832, the state of Georgia had refused the Cherokee the right to hold council meetings unless the meeting dealt with treaties that gave away their lands. The Cherokee decided to move their capital from New Echota, Georgia across the state line to Red Clay, Tennessee because the state of Tennessee did not prohibit the Cherokees from meeting together. Thus, Red Clay became the seat of the Cherokee government in 1832 and lasted until the removal of the Cherokees to the west in 1838. Red Clay was composed of 11 general councils and the meetings were attended by up to 5000 people. It was at Red Clay that the Cherokee learned that they had lost all of their land and would be removed to the west. Red Clay consists of the sacred Blue Hole Spring, a reconstructed council house, and several reconstructed homestead buildings. Red Clay is home to the Eternal Flame, lit on April 6, 1984. The Cherokees took hot coals from their council fire at Red Clay on the Trail of Tears. The flame was taken to Cherokee, North Carolina in the 1950s but was returned to Red Clay in 1984.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Expansion and Reform (1801-1861)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002508
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Title: Photograph of the posthole patterns of a mid-18th century Cherokee townhouse at Mialoquo
Photographer : Gerald F. Schroedl
Date Created: 1977
Abstract: This is a photograph of posthole patterns of a winter townhouse dating back to the mid-18th century at the Overhill Cherokee village of Mialoquo. Overhill townhouses were situated in a common village plaza. There was generally a winter townhouse, which was a large circular dome in which a fire could be built in the center and an adjacent rectangular open pavilion for summer use. Both were used for public social and political activity. Excavations of Mialoquo were conducted by the University of Tennessee in 1977 as part of the Tellico Archaeological Project in anticipation of the flooding of the Lower Little Tennessee River by the Tellico Dam Reservoir. The excavations were conducted under contract with the National Park Service and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Principal investigator, Jefferson Chapman. Field Director, Gerald F. Schroedl.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     Colonization and Settlement (1585-1763)
Collection: Frank H. McClung Museum Photographic Collection
Contributing Institution: Frank H. McClung Museum
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002548
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Title: Avalon, Nashville Bible School President's Home
Photographer : H.O. Fuller
Date Created: 1904
Abstract: The president's home for the president of Nashville Bible School, now David Lipscomb University. It was designed by Mrs. "Aunt Mag" Lipscomb. Avalon was at various times used as a dining hall for men and women, a fine arts building, library and classrooms. The house itself is 2 stories, made of brick, and has a front porch.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)
Collection: Nashville Bible School
Contributing Institution: Lipscomb University -Beaman Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002296
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Title: Lindsay Hall, Nashville Bible School Boys' Dormitory
Photographer : H.O. Fuller
Date Created: 1900 - 1930
Abstract: Lindsay Hall, a dormitory at Nashville Bible College, was named for Texan Edwin L. Lindsay. It housed young men from 1905 until it burned in December, 1929. It was replaced by Elam Hall. Nashville Bible College became David Lipscomb University.
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)
Collection: Nashville Bible School
Contributing Institution: Lipscomb University -Beaman Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002298
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Title: Nashville Bible School Administration Building
Photographer : H.O. Fuller
Date Created: 1903
Abstract: The administration building, now known as Harding Hall, served as the main classroom building. It also held a chapel and offices. It is currently part of David Lipscomb High School
Tennessee State Department of Education Eras:
     The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930)
Collection: Nashville Bible School
Contributing Institution: Lipscomb University -Beaman Library
URL: http://idserver.utk.edu/?id=200800000002299
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