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Title:[Letter] 1846 Feb. 27, Nashville [TN] [to] L. E. / Ada : a machine readable transcription of an image
Author:Ada
Availability:

This work is the property of the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, TN. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching, and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text. For all other use contact the Tennessee State Library and Archives, 403 Seventh Avenue North, Nashville, TN 37243-0312. (615) 741-2764.

Date: February 27, 1846
Extent: 4p
Summary:This is a letter dated February 27, 1846. It is from a woman named Ada to L. E., who is probably a man. Ada writes about a terrible event in her town where a woman named Rosalie died from a broken heart after being betrayed by a womanizer. Ada is very upset because she feels that it is a common occurrence, and admonishes L. E. never to do anything of the sort. She also mysteriously writes that she may have to stop corresponding with him.
Collection:Orr Collection IV-J-2
Box:2
Folder:2
Document:sl189
Categories:
Keywords:




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Nashville Feby [February] 27th 1846
To L E

The world is not yet destroyed by Millerism nor by the annexation of Texas— what the Oregon question will bring to pass is in the future. Infidelity in matters of the [added: heart] by man — has destroyed its victims by thousands — and yet what smooth names are given to it — such as a gay "Lothario" — or gay deciever [deceiver] — but in my humble opinion, should be descinated [designated] assassination — Yes; tis cruel butchery to break the heart strings of lovely innocence by degrees — And yet it is so romantic — there is something so delightfully charming and exciting to have a flirtation with a beauty or a belle — something so heroic and magnanimous to play the hypocrite to win the affections of innocence and unsuspecting youth — it is really an achievement to boast of a feather in the cap — exhibiting tact and talent of no ordinary character worthy a "Napoleon" — to which is attached merit of a superior order— and has so much of nobleness, and honor about it — as to be made a proper subject for street gossip — Such is a part of your [added: boasted] superiority over woman — Aye — woman — the very best and most lovely part of creation — How often is it the case that the path [of of] sweet, confiding woman is set with thorns — when it should have been strewn with flowers — I am neither drawing or painting a fancy sketch — examples are abundant of the reckless duplicity of man towards woman — One is yet fresh in my memory — whose history is but the emblem of thousands — and such deeds of darkness go unpunished — Rosalie — was gentle — kind and with a disposition altogether charming — it was impossible to know her, without perceiving her most excellent traits of character which had




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Cemented and bound to her many friends — and her sad fate will often call forth the unbidden tear sacred to her memory — Charles — [unclear: B ] — had just entered upon his profession — which was that of the law — when accident made him acquainted with Rosalie — He came not as a warrior with glittering sword or spear — nor as a conqueror with the breath of victory upon his brow — But he came with a smile in his eye and the bloom of youth upon his cheek — with melting words of love upon his lips — His eye looked an unerring index, that his soul was pure — and his bearing — that of a gentleman — such were the weapons with which he took captive her too susceptible heart — His vows, were the eloquent vows of love until he obtained an ackowledgement from R [Rosalie] — of her love — He suddenly grew more cold and indifferent as though he achieved all he desired — And his solem [solemn] oaths were soon forgot — He left her struggling heart wounded and stricken and crushed by the very power, which she looked to as a ministering angel to [added: bring] her peace — xxxxxx

Her young life ebbed away as she saw each hope prove false and the silken cords which entwined around her heart were rudely severed — She [unclear: was meret? ] not but as [added: a] fair flower beneath the blast — she faded fast With a broken heart — she fell a victim to the infidelity of man — and her gentle spirit winged its way from earth to heaven — where sorrow will never wring [added: it] more — Her mortal remains lie burried [buried] in the church yard — over which is erected a marble — to tell the passenger and stranger this is now the dwelling place of what was once lovely and innocent the mortal remains of Rosalie — She was cut off in the spring time of life — a lovely flower, niped [nipped] by treachery — to gratify a false ambition and as infamous as false — Aye tis cruel to sport with the




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feelings of the heart — particularly where the [added: heart] is young and tender — "It may be sport for you — but death to us " —

And this is woman's history — her hearts history
The tale of one who loved, as only woman loves —
In sickness and in sorrow — and in death —

For the dignity and honor of human nature — I hope you will never decieve innocence — nor betray the Confiding heart of woman — There is nothing magnanimous noble or generous in such an act — and betrays in him who is guilty of [added: it] either weakness — or a black heart as hard as it is black —

You have recently been saying to your friend Mr "Remmington" that "Ada had forgotten you" — Not so — the finger of time may write furrows upon my cheeks — but can never obliterate from the heart, the memory of other days — Womans heart is sometimes compared to wax , or being easy to make an impression upon — yet when made — it is as lasting, as if written by a point of steel, upon a plate of brass — I did not see you but once I believe — during your last visit — as most of my time was spent with some friends in the country — and we had come in — to attend the "fair" — when I took occasion to drop you through the letter box — of the fair — a short epistle — I never learned whether or not you received it — There will be a day — (and perhaps not far distant) when this addresing [addressing] you will cease — from a cause — it would be imprudent in me to mention — but will explain its self in due course of time — "He that hath an ear let him hear" —

I have heard something about your Mr. Remmington — and I have some curiosity to see him — I am told he has a great regard for the ladies — if so — it bespeaks him a man — aye a jewel of the "first water" —




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I am writing this by candle-light — with the Thermometer twenty degrees below freezing point — so you must excuse my cold expressions all — but the infidelity of your sex — which should be entered upon the statute books, as murder in the first degree — and punishable accordingly — for if there is any difference in crime it is [added: in] favor of the being who stabs or shoots his fellow being; for then, the pain and suffering is soon over — but in the other case — the death is gradual — with a thousand hopes crushed, as soon almost as formed

But I have written enough, in my feeble way, on this subject for the present — and as it is now ten oclock P. M. will close by wishing you health — happiness and a long life

Ada



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